Science Fun

NEWS

Posted On: 13 Apr

Northwoods Elementary is our Spotlight School of the week

SCHOOL: Northwoods

GRADE LEVEL: 3rd
PROGRAM: Our Place In Space
INSTRUCTOR: Mary Colbert
Scientist Mary’s Experience:

I was able to spend an awesome day with the 3rd grade class at Northwoods elementary, learning about planets and our solar system. One of the very first things I like to ask the students is “to tell me what you already know.” Each of the classes brought a lot of knowledge to the table. Many of the students told me “Jupiter has 62-67 moons and that Pluto was named a dwarf planet in 2006, the year they were born”. I even had one class, write me a letter because they were very excited about space. The letter had information about how long the earth takes to orbit the Sun, rotate on its axis, and cool information about Neptune.

The students also did a fantastic job making their glow in the dark constellations that they took home with them. Some of the students were extra imaginative and created their one of a kind constellation. They also made their own sundials, which we successfully used outside to determine the time. The very last thing we had to do was to send our water rockets blasting off!

I had a wonderful time at Northwoods. I am very proud of the students and can already tell that there are future scientists among them!

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Posted On: 7 Apr

Wake Forest Elementary is our Spotlight School of the week

SCHOOL: Wake Forest

GRADE LEVEL: 5th
PROGRAM: Storm Chasers
INSTRUCTOR: John McLeod-Moya
Scientist John’s Experience:

The other day I visited 5th graders at Wake Forest Elementary. We explored meteorology, or the science of weather, and had an awesome time. We learned that meteorology is very exciting, and that extreme forms of weather can be a blast to learn about!

First we explored lightning and clouds. Not only did we learn where these phenomena come from, but we also had the chance to touch real lightning and make a real cloud. Later we explored the world of weather using real meteorological tools, and a few activities to help demonstrate concepts we talked about. Free exploration time was a great chance to work with friends while having fun learning about wind, air pressure, precipitation, and vortex storms. The tornado tubes, wind bags (large bags we learned to blow up in one breath), and anemometers (tools that measure wind speed) were particular favorites.

After free exploration time we learned about convection, and I showed the kids how to move objects with my mind…Just kidding, we made cartesian diver barometers which we could use to test air pressure. When you squeeze this barometer a diver inside of it moves, allowing you to see the change in pressure (or trick our friends into thinking you are a Jedi). Young scientists decorated their barometers and adjusted them to make them sensitive to the slightest application of pressure.

The class had a blast, and were glad they had the opportunity to experiment with real scientific instruments. One child said “I love when we get to do hands on stuff, it makes science fun!” I can’t wait till the next time we return to Wake Forest, and I know we left a great impression on their 5th grade class.

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Posted On: 2 Apr

Mythbusters is coming to Raleigh’s Memorial Auditorium!

unnamedDate of show: April 29th at 8:00 PM

For a limited time, get tickets to Mythbusters for just $30!
(Save up to $25 using special offer code “SCIENCEFUN”)

The all-new, live stage show “MythBusters© Jamie & Adam Unleashed,” starring Jamie Hyneman and Adam Savage, co-hosts of the Emmy-nominated Discovery series MythBusters©, promises to be an unexpected evening of on-stage experiments, audience participation, rocking video and behind-the-scenes stories. Fans will join Jamie and Adam on stage and assist in their mind-twisting and not always orthodox approach to science.

“MythBusters© Jamie & Adam Unleashed” brings you face to face with the curious world of Jamie and Adam as the duo matches wits on stage with each other and members of the audience.

Hurry—This offer ends April 15th!

Special offer code is: “SCIENCEFUN” Save up to $25 per ticket!
$30 ticket offer valid on Orchestra, Mezzanine and Balcony tickets only.

Click Here for More Info

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Posted On: 23 Mar

Voyager Elementary is our Spotlight School of the week

SCHOOL: Voyager Elementary

GRADE LEVEL: 2nd
PROGRAM: Weather Wise
INSTRUCTOR: Heather Fisher
Scientist Heather’s Experience:

I got to spend this cloudy, drizzly Thursday learning all about weather with the second graders at Voyager elementary! We were amazed to see how the “lightning bolts” in our plasma ball were attracted to everyone’s fingers, just like lightening is attracted to the ground, and followed our fingers when we moved them. We also got to look at a hailstorm in a jar and watch how bubbles pushed our model hail (pasta) up and down just like an updraft would in a real hail storm. Unfortunately our pasta hail did not grow layers and break any records, otherwise we all could have had pasta for lunch! Then it got pretty stormy in the classrooms, as we measured rainfall with rain gauges, wind speed with anemometers, and even made some tornadoes and hurricanes! Students were excited to continue monitoring the wind and rain with their very own weather stations at home! Finally, as our grand finale, I got to use air pressure and wind to blast some hats off of the students’ heads with our cloud blaster! I think most students agreed that was their favorite part of the program!

I was blown away by how well everyone did with all of our weather experiments!

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Posted On: 9 Mar

Laurel Park Elementary is our Spotlight School of the week

SCHOOL: Laurel Park Elementary

GRADE LEVEL: 2nd
PROGRAM: Weather Wise
INSTRUCTOR: Craig Kwiatkowski
Scientist Craig’s Experience:

Today we all woke up to quite a surprise: a delay at school and no snow or ice! Well rested, I made my way to Laurel Park in the afternoon to teach Ms. Carnell and Ms. Butler’s classes all about weather. What an awesome day it was to join them. Not only were they well rested from the delay, but they were excited to be just a few hours away from tracking out.

I started off the afternoon in Ms. Carnell’s class. I was welcomed to the classroom with several smiles and enthusiastic waves. We began our program in a shocking way, by getting struck by lightning. Of course this wasn’t real lightning, but something much weaker. The students learned about how lighting and thunder are formed and then got to see how lightning and electricity are attracted to us.

The also got the opportunity to create their very own weather stations. We mixed up some chemicals and constructed some masterpieces. In all the excitement, some of the students had some wet plaster to start with and we quickly found out it resulted in some leaning weather stations. Fortunately, we had a few helpers and let it dry for a bit before we put them back in.

I finished my day in Ms. Butler’s classroom. As I entered, they were hard at work, but I could see a few of them peeking as I was setting up. We quickly got started and continued our weather discussions with some free exploration time with weather tools. The students were competing against each other trying to see how fast they could make the anemometers go. I discovered a lot of the students had quite a bit of air to expel. We saw one student’s reading get all the way up to 18 mph. Wow, that’s fast! We concluded the program with our famous cloud blasters. We observed the movement of air by filling our blaster with clouds and releasing them all over the classroom. The best part was when the students put on special party hats and I blasted them off their heads with the clouds.

Overall, I had an awesome experience at Laurel Park and hope the teachers and students did as well. I can’t wait to go back and hope they have an awesome track out!

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Posted On: 27 Feb

Joyner Elementary is our Spotlight School of the week

SCHOOL: Joyner Elementary

GRADE LEVEL: 3rdSpotlight-School-joyner
PROGRAM: Our Place in Space
INSTRUCTOR: Christine Martin
Scientist Christine’s Experience:

Space, some people call the last frontier, was the topic of today’s programs. The Junior Astronomers and I made a mini solar system, created constellations, designed sun dials, and even got to blast things into space (or at least we tried). Because of the wet conditions outside, even one lucky group got to make some Mars Snow!

Speaking of snow, the scientist have been busy working in the lab instead of being out in the classrooms. Due to this, a lot of flexible teachers had to rearrange their schedules to accommodate the scientists. Well, the teachers at Joyner Elementary were troopers! They helped the scientists and the Junior Astronomers by being hands on and participating during the whole program! I had one class where the three teachers worked together to make sure our Water Bottle Rocket Blast Offs were the best they could possibly be. I really do think one bottle almost broke out of the atmosphere. Seeing great team work and dedication like that reminds me how not just the students, but the teachers get out of our soaring programs. Thanks Joyner Teachers!

I am looking forward to the next time I get to visit Joyner and share more scientific experiments with them. Until then, watch the skies!

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Posted On: 26 Feb

Snow Day Mini Camp Tomorrow!

Single Day Science Camp, tomorrow!

kid2

If you are looking for something FUN for your junior scientist, then we’ll have all sorts of experiments going on at The Lab!

leran more

Register soon if you are interested because space is limited. Once we’re full, we’re full. As much as we would love to accommodate all of your enthusiastic experimenters, we only have so much room!

Hours and pricing for our single day camps are:
Full Day: 10:00 am – 4:30 pm – $79
*In order to let the roads thaw for safe travel, we will open our doors at 10:00 AM

register-button

Unlike our week long camps, we do NOT offer early drop off or late pick up for single day camps. We apologize for any inconvenience.

We will provide a morning and afternoon science snack.
Please send your camper with a non-refrigerated, peanut free lunch.
Pizza and a juice are available for $5.

Please no drop-ins. Registration must be completed online before coming to ensure we have room.

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Posted On: 23 Feb

Green Hope Elementary is our Spotlight School of the week

SCHOOL: Green Hope Elementary

GRADE LEVEL: 5thSpotlight-School-green-hope
PROGRAM: Newton’s Lab
INSTRUCTOR: Aaron Henderson
Scientist Aaron’s Experience:

This week I was fortunate enough with the winter weather to still go to Green Hope Elementary School and talk to fifth graders about physics. We spent our 75 minutes talking about Isaac Newton and the great things he did specifically in the realm of how and why things move.

This program is mainly focused on the three laws of motion that Newton wrote and examples of how we can see these laws everyday. Simply talking through these laws can quickly become boring, but with the experiments that I brought in and added to each law, it became much more fun and the kids really enjoyed talking about these laws.

Once we went through the laws, it was time to put them into action with our catapult contest. With the class split into groups, the kids launched various objects with miniature catapults to a basket to see which team could catch the most. This activity is always great because the kids are able to see clearly how mass effects the amount of force necessary to accelerate an object.

After we talked about how each object behaved when launched with the catapult, it was time to make our balloon powered car. This take home experiment allowed the kids to add force to a car with a balloon so that it would accelerate on its own. They loved building something themselves and having it to take home to show their siblings how it works and the science behind it.

Going through this program with the Green Hope children was very cool for me because of how the kids responded. As I asked some tough questions about how objects behaved when launched from the catapult, I could see these kids really processing and giving really good answers to why things happened a certain way. Having kids that are that engaged in a program is a real treat for me to see.

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Posted On: 19 Feb

Snow Day Mini Camp at the Lab

Schools are closed!

Looking for something FUN for your child?

Single Day Science Camp, tomorrow!

snow-day

What a crazy couple of days!
Schools are closed again on Friday in Wake County, but the Lab is open!

If you are looking for something FUN for your junior scientist, then we’ll have all sorts of experiments going on at The Lab!

leran more

Register soon if you are interested because space is limited. Once we’re full, we’re full. As much as we would love to accommodate all of your enthusiastic experimenters, we only have so much room!

Hours and pricing for our single day camp are:
Full Day: 9:30 am – 4:30 pm – $79
1/2 Day (AM): 9:30 am – 12:30 pm – $49
1/2 Day (PM): 1:30 pm – 4:30 pm – $49

register-button

Unlike our week long camps, we do NOT offer early drop off or late pick up for single day camps. We apologize for any inconvenience.

We will provide a morning and afternoon science snack.
Please send your camper with a non-refrigerated, peanut free lunch.
Pizza and a juice are available for $5.

Please no drop-ins. Registration must be completed online before coming to ensure we have room.

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Posted On: 16 Feb

Rand Road Elementary is our Spotlight School of the week

SCHOOL: Rand Road Elementary

GRADE LEVEL: 1st
PROGRAM: Soil Rocks
INSTRUCTOR: Seth Shelby
Scientist Seth’s Experience:

This week I had the pleasure of teaching 1st graders at Rand Road Elementary school. Having fun with all the bright young scientists at this wonderful school was a real blast. Our program was dealing with soil and rocks, and every group I had was eager to become geologists for the day.

Each group of students brought a lot of energy to the experiments. Every session asked really intriguing questions, and we would discuss the answers as a class. After we learned about soil in the beginning of the session students were given their own Soil Safari to study. The students were really excited to see earthworms in their safari, and everyone was very gentle with them. I don’t think I heard a single “EWWW!” from anyone all day, but I definitely heard “Ahhh Cool!” a number of times; which always makes me happy.
After that we started to explore our rocks and minerals, and it seemed to me that the students enjoyed mining for their gems the most. We turned the lights off and used our headlamps to help us find different types of rocks and minerals in our mining pans. Students did a great job classifying what they found. It was really fun to watch everyone share what they found as well. Every session I had really did a great job of not only following the directions but also cooperating with each other. It really makes me a happy instructor to see students eager to share their new found treasures with their fellow classmates, and Rand Road Elementary was filled with such students.

I can’t convey enough how much fun I had with each class at Rand Road. They are truly producing some very bright young scientists, and I can’t wait to come back. Keep exploring my friends, and remember soil rocks and so do you!

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